Now Playing Tracks

peterpayne:

We had fun in Fairbanks, Alaska, where we’d gone to see the “northern lights.” Of course you can’t really see them with the naked eye, and you need a good-ish camera to capture them instead.
To photograph the aurora borealis, prepare ahead of time how to do it right rather than getting to the top of a mountain with no Internet then trying to figure it out, like I did. You’ll need a good camera (I was using a Canon Powershot S120 but any similar camera or DSLR is fine) with tripod. Set your ISO (some people said 800 but I had mine all the way up to 3200), set your shutter time (these were done with 5-15 second shots), and start snapping. We learned a fun trick from the Japanese person who was running an aurora sightseeing service: pose people in front of the camera and shine a flashlight on them for 1 second, or a smartphone screen the whole time, to get decent pictures of people posing with northern lights in the background.
(The girls were four Softbank employees who were traveling together. They were so cute I couldn’t help taking their pictures.)
Zoom Info
peterpayne:

We had fun in Fairbanks, Alaska, where we’d gone to see the “northern lights.” Of course you can’t really see them with the naked eye, and you need a good-ish camera to capture them instead.
To photograph the aurora borealis, prepare ahead of time how to do it right rather than getting to the top of a mountain with no Internet then trying to figure it out, like I did. You’ll need a good camera (I was using a Canon Powershot S120 but any similar camera or DSLR is fine) with tripod. Set your ISO (some people said 800 but I had mine all the way up to 3200), set your shutter time (these were done with 5-15 second shots), and start snapping. We learned a fun trick from the Japanese person who was running an aurora sightseeing service: pose people in front of the camera and shine a flashlight on them for 1 second, or a smartphone screen the whole time, to get decent pictures of people posing with northern lights in the background.
(The girls were four Softbank employees who were traveling together. They were so cute I couldn’t help taking their pictures.)
Zoom Info
peterpayne:

We had fun in Fairbanks, Alaska, where we’d gone to see the “northern lights.” Of course you can’t really see them with the naked eye, and you need a good-ish camera to capture them instead.
To photograph the aurora borealis, prepare ahead of time how to do it right rather than getting to the top of a mountain with no Internet then trying to figure it out, like I did. You’ll need a good camera (I was using a Canon Powershot S120 but any similar camera or DSLR is fine) with tripod. Set your ISO (some people said 800 but I had mine all the way up to 3200), set your shutter time (these were done with 5-15 second shots), and start snapping. We learned a fun trick from the Japanese person who was running an aurora sightseeing service: pose people in front of the camera and shine a flashlight on them for 1 second, or a smartphone screen the whole time, to get decent pictures of people posing with northern lights in the background.
(The girls were four Softbank employees who were traveling together. They were so cute I couldn’t help taking their pictures.)
Zoom Info
peterpayne:

We had fun in Fairbanks, Alaska, where we’d gone to see the “northern lights.” Of course you can’t really see them with the naked eye, and you need a good-ish camera to capture them instead.
To photograph the aurora borealis, prepare ahead of time how to do it right rather than getting to the top of a mountain with no Internet then trying to figure it out, like I did. You’ll need a good camera (I was using a Canon Powershot S120 but any similar camera or DSLR is fine) with tripod. Set your ISO (some people said 800 but I had mine all the way up to 3200), set your shutter time (these were done with 5-15 second shots), and start snapping. We learned a fun trick from the Japanese person who was running an aurora sightseeing service: pose people in front of the camera and shine a flashlight on them for 1 second, or a smartphone screen the whole time, to get decent pictures of people posing with northern lights in the background.
(The girls were four Softbank employees who were traveling together. They were so cute I couldn’t help taking their pictures.)
Zoom Info

peterpayne:

We had fun in Fairbanks, Alaska, where we’d gone to see the “northern lights.” Of course you can’t really see them with the naked eye, and you need a good-ish camera to capture them instead.

To photograph the aurora borealis, prepare ahead of time how to do it right rather than getting to the top of a mountain with no Internet then trying to figure it out, like I did. You’ll need a good camera (I was using a Canon Powershot S120 but any similar camera or DSLR is fine) with tripod. Set your ISO (some people said 800 but I had mine all the way up to 3200), set your shutter time (these were done with 5-15 second shots), and start snapping. We learned a fun trick from the Japanese person who was running an aurora sightseeing service: pose people in front of the camera and shine a flashlight on them for 1 second, or a smartphone screen the whole time, to get decent pictures of people posing with northern lights in the background.

(The girls were four Softbank employees who were traveling together. They were so cute I couldn’t help taking their pictures.)

We make Tumblr themes